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September 12th, 2014
thesmithian

The show revolves around the last major speech Dr. King gave, April 4th, 1967, one year to the day before he was assassinated.

more.

The show revolves around the last major speech Dr. King gave, April 4th, 1967, one year to the day before he was assassinated.

more.

April 6th, 2014
thesmithian

When we think about the Civil Rights Act, our minds are drawn to scenes of obstructionist Southern politicians and presidential arm-twisting. But we often forget the broader context of activism and protest in which the bill’s long journey across Capitol Hill took place…These two stories—the political theater inside the Capitol, and the violent tumult of civil rights protests outside it—did not happen independently. Each drove the other. Few pieces of legislation in American history have been as intimately connected to its social context as the Civil Rights Act.

more.

March 28th, 2014
thesmithian

' …rapper/actor Common held a concert in Jackson, Mississippi…'

…to support Nissan workers in nearby Canton who are trying to organize and join a union. Common was joined at the concert by actor Danny Glover, and Sean (Diddy) Combs sent a video message of support, saying “my heart is with you, my spirit is with you and the workers at Nissan. Workers’ rights are civil rights.”

more, plus video message, here.

March 18th, 2014
thesmithian

…exploring the relationship between African American and Native peoples of Virginia, she unraveled the story of…a racial divide that the Civil Rights movement has never eroded. Virginia’s miscegenation laws, from the law of hypo-descent to the Racial Integrity Act, are burned into the hearts and culture of Virginians, white, black and Indian.

more.

…exploring the relationship between African American and Native peoples of Virginia, she unraveled the story of…a racial divide that the Civil Rights movement has never eroded. Virginia’s miscegenation laws, from the law of hypo-descent to the Racial Integrity Act, are burned into the hearts and culture of Virginians, white, black and Indian.

more.

March 9th, 2014
thesmithian

A “Jeopardy” answer might be: “He was the most famous civil rights activist not to attend the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.” The correct question to that answer is “Who was Stokely Carmichael?” Another such answer might be: “He invented the slogan ‘Black Power’ and married famed South African singer Miriam Makeba.” The question again is “Who was Stokely Carmichael?”

more.

A “Jeopardy” answer might be: “He was the most famous civil rights activist not to attend the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.” The correct question to that answer is “Who was Stokely Carmichael?” Another such answer might be: “He invented the slogan ‘Black Power’ and married famed South African singer Miriam Makeba.” The question again is “Who was Stokely Carmichael?”

more.

March 1st, 2014
thesmithian

'…if a restaurant decided they wanted to throw out a gay couple, that couple should…just go somewhere else. It isn't the government's role to protect the civil rights of people. If a business owner's God didn't like black people, for example, he could simply throw them out and put up a sign saying “no blacks allowed for religious reasons”…If a Muslim business owner didn't want to serve Jewish people, just go somewhere else, Jews. I presume [the writer] would appreciate some sort of app or website that kept a catalog of which businesses do business with which groups of people. That's the sort of society he wants to live in. Which was exactly how things were before the Civil Rights Act…'

Pretty shocking. But more importantly, why is it that [the writer] seems to think that it is the government’s role to protect the rights of business owners? The government shouldn’t protect a customer’s right to be treated fairly. Instead, that should left up to the market. But a business owner’s right to treat people unfairly, why that should be protected by government statute!

more.

February 8th, 2014
thesmithian

After the 1941 Pearl Harbor attacks…Fred Korematsu challenged President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066 that authorized the U.S. military to forcibly remove more than 120,000 people, mostly of Japanese descent, from their homes and into incarceration camps throughout the country. Two-thirds of these people were American citizens. Mr. Korematsu went into hiding in the Oakland area, becoming a fugitive, and was arrested and convicted of violating the federal order. His case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

On Jan. 30, the White House issued a statement honoring the legacy of Fred Korematsu.

February 2nd, 2014
thesmithian

…should you…read any of the pablum being doled out during Black History Month about the tired older woman who just sat down on that bus, be aware that though yes, Rosa Parks did refuse to give up her seat, and yes she will always be recorded in history for having done so—know the whole story, not just of Parks the individual at one moment in time, but Parks as a symbol of a mass movement which is ongoing—for justice, for equality and an end to racism, racist violence and systemic inequity.

more.

…should you…read any of the pablum being doled out during Black History Month about the tired older woman who just sat down on that bus, be aware that though yes, Rosa Parks did refuse to give up her seat, and yes she will always be recorded in history for having done so—know the whole story, not just of Parks the individual at one moment in time, but Parks as a symbol of a mass movement which is ongoing—for justice, for equality and an end to racism, racist violence and systemic inequity.

more.

November 30th, 2013
thesmithian

…valuable are his reflections on the working culture of mid-20th-century black journalists who confronted unique dangers while covering stories that white journalists initially ignored but that over time came to absorb the country’s attention.

familiar.

October 22nd, 2013
thesmithian

“We will not be looking for a young person particularly, but rather someone who can duplicate Ben Jealous’ ability to raise resources, which was prodigious; someone who can keep the organization strong, someone who is familiar with the civil rights community and who can work with our coalition partners, who is comfortable with people of all sorts—and if he or she is young, that’s an extra benefit…”

October 10th, 2013
thesmithian

'The cleavage between North and South, began by slavery, has set the fault lines of American politics again and again. This time, the crisis isn’t as severe as the civil war, nor as divisive as the battle over civil rights. But make no mistake: today’s Republican radicalism, with all of its attendent terrifying brinksmanship, is the grandchild of the white South’s devastating defeats in the struggle over racial exclusion…'

more.

September 25th, 2013
thesmithian

…Evers was a WWII Army veteran and fought in the Battle of Normandy…he earned his…degree and became a civil rights activist…Floyd McKissick was also a WWII Army veteran…After the War, he graduated from Morehouse and later became the first African American student at the UNC at Chapel Hill’s Law School. In ‘66, McKissick became the leader of CORE. Two African American members of the U.S. House of Representatives, John Conyers and Charles Rangel, are Korean War veterans. Conyers has been…representing a district in Detroit and serves on the Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Civil Liberties…Rangel, a native New Yorker…received a Purple Heart and Bronze Star…The U.S. military, and specifically our nation’s involvement in the Korean War, was the beginning of the end of institutionalized segregation in America…

more.

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