>

July 10th, 2014
thesmithian

'A powerful government workers' union will end its support for the United Negro College Fund after the group accepted $25 million from the conservative powerhouse Koch brothers and the college fund's president appeared at a Koch event. In a letter made public Thursday, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees said it will no longer partner with or raise funds for the fund, known for its iconic motto, “A mind is a terrible thing to waste.”'

more.

July 4th, 2014
thesmithian

'In 2013, of the 30,000 students that took U.S. high school Advanced Placement computer science exam, less than 20% were female, eight percent were Hispanic, and three percent were black. No female, black or Hispanic students took the exam in Mississippi or Montana. The poorest communities, often the most diverse, have the most limited access to technology. According to a Pew Internet study, just three percent of teachers of the poorest classrooms feel that their students have access to the digital tools they need at home.'

more.

June 30th, 2014
thesmithian

'…the deference our professional and political classes feel toward the hallowed groves of academe, probably explain why this industry has been able to get away with 30 years of something close to price gouging, a practice that would never be tolerated from any other provider of life’s necessities. They also explain why American students have done virtually nothing to stop the spiral while students elsewhere take to the streets in fury when threatened with the tiniest tuition increases.'

more.

June 20th, 2014
thesmithian

…Japanese artist Yusuke Asai has covered a primary school classroom in Maharashtra in an intricate and hypnotizing mural made with mud.

more.

June 14th, 2014
thesmithian

ucresearch:

In 1942 a young African American Ph.D. in mathematics, David Blackwell, interviewed for a teaching job at Berkeley. He was hired, but not for many years.

When finally invited to join the statistics faculty in 1952, several of Blackwell’s new colleagues told him there was a backstory to his failed application a decade earlier. It had been decided to offer him a position in mathematics, they said, but the wife of the departmental chair, who sometimes invited the faculty to dinner, insisted she would not have a black person in her house — and the offer was squelched.

Blackwell, who eventually became the first tenured black professor in the University of California system, shares this vivid memory in a 10-hour interview with the Bancroft Library’s Regional Oral History Office (ROHO). His life history is part of a recently completed oral-history series on 18 pioneering African American faculty and senior administrators, hired before the advent of affirmative-action policies in the 1970s, who broke barriers and laid the groundwork for those who followed.

Read more

[look of the hour]

June 9th, 2014
thesmithian

'…what happens when I meet someone and we want to get married. Then my debt becomes their debt…These are all adult things that I never thought about when I was 18 and agreeing to take on a student loan.”

more.

June 8th, 2014
thesmithian

…chronicles the deterioration of the country’s once-vaunted state college system, where a majority of students pursuing a postsecondary degree are enrolled. She bemoans the fact that the community ­colleges, which play a central role in educating the “less advantaged,” must beg for money, and she lays into for-profit ­colleges like the University of Phoenix, the largest of the 1,000 or so of these institutions that have sprouted up in recent years.

more.

…chronicles the deterioration of the country’s once-vaunted state college system, where a majority of students pursuing a postsecondary degree are enrolled. She bemoans the fact that the community ­colleges, which play a central role in educating the “less advantaged,” must beg for money, and she lays into for-profit ­colleges like the University of Phoenix, the largest of the 1,000 or so of these institutions that have sprouted up in recent years.

more.

May 27th, 2014
thesmithian
His scores had earned him admission to the University of Virginia, but the school had politely offered to pay his tuition at Howard once it discovered he was black. He became the president of his engineering class at Howard and went on to succeed in his career. But the one thing I noticed very early on was that he didn’t have any white friends or colleagues. As far as I could tell, the only white people my father knew were the fathers and mothers of the kids on my sports teams. Early in my life he made it very clear in his words and actions that he wanted me to be able to navigate the white world seamlessly so that I could, as he always put it, write my own ticket.
May 18th, 2014
thesmithian

'…the belief that students were often blocked from living up to their potential by the presence of certain fears and anxieties and doubts…These feelings were especially virulent at moments of educational transition—like the freshman year of high school or the freshman year of college. And they seemed to be particularly debilitating among members of groups that felt themselves to be under some special threat or scrutiny: women in engineering programs, first-generation college students, African-Americans in the Ivy League.'

The negative thoughts took different forms in each individual…but they mostly gathered around two ideas. One set of thoughts was about belonging. Students in transition often experienced profound doubts about whether they really belonged—or could ever belong—in their new institution. The other was connected to ability. Many students believed in what Carol Dweck had named an entity theory of intelligence—that intelligence was a fixed quality that was impossible to improve through practice or study.

more.

May 18th, 2014
thesmithian

Newark has fifty new principals, four new public high schools, a new teachers’ contract that ties pay to performance, and an agreement by most charter schools to serve their share of the neediest students. But…

a lot more, here.

+++++

photo by Krisanne Johnson

May 17th, 2014
thesmithian
You know, I was locked up previously…I feel way more confident now.

Jerome Davis

a 42-year-old who graduated from ECA’s weatherization program, said his work with the Connection Training Services staff instilled a sense of confidence in him that he lacked the last time he had been released from jail.

CTS is

…has worked to give the formerly incarcerated of Philadelphia—where the recidivism rate is 65.3 percent and three-year reincarceration rate is 41.1 percent — the skills they need to land on their feet. Last week, CTS graduated the first crop of participants in their new federally funded Training to Work program.

May 17th, 2014
thesmithian

Baldwin’s frank…perspectives…may have made him unpopular at a time which many people prefer to think of as postracial, and in which Black classics must fight for the few token slots available on a whitewashed reading list.

more.

Baldwin’s frank…perspectives…may have made him unpopular at a time which many people prefer to think of as postracial, and in which Black classics must fight for the few token slots available on a whitewashed reading list.

more.

May 17th, 2014
thesmithian
…the academic achievement gap between rich and poor students is now even wider than the gap between black and white students was in 1950.
May 10th, 2014
thesmithian
The girls themselves also knew full well the dangers they might encounter. Their school had recently been closed due to terrorist threats…but these girls still insisted on returning to take their exams. They were so determined to move to the next level of their education…so determined to one day build careers of their own and make their families and communities proud. And what happened in Nigeria was not an isolated incident…it’s a story we see every day as girls around the world risk their lives to pursue their ambitions.
Loading tweets...

@danamo

Likes

culture is politics. politics is culture.
[beta]

Networks

Following