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December 5th, 2013
thesmithian

Racially biased marijuana enforcement…effects extend far beyond the degrading experience of being arrested and jailed. Most serious are the lifelong criminal records produced by a single arrest. Twenty years ago, misdemeanor arrest records were papers stored in dusty file cabinets. Now they are computerized and instantly available for $20 or less from commercial database firms…Employers, landlords, schools, banks and credit card companies rule out applicants on the basis of these now universally available records, which have been aptly described as a “scarlet letter” and a “new Jim Crow.”

more.

Racially biased marijuana enforcement…effects extend far beyond the degrading experience of being arrested and jailed. Most serious are the lifelong criminal records produced by a single arrest. Twenty years ago, misdemeanor arrest records were papers stored in dusty file cabinets. Now they are computerized and instantly available for $20 or less from commercial database firms…Employers, landlords, schools, banks and credit card companies rule out applicants on the basis of these now universally available records, which have been aptly described as a “scarlet letter” and a “new Jim Crow.”

more.

June 28th, 2013
thesmithian

To little national fanfare, the largest liberal protest of 2013 took place on Monday this week in North Carolina, with thousands in attendance and hundreds getting arrested…This week’s Moral Monday protest…was the largest to date with more than 3,000 people in attendance.

lots more photos, and videos, here.

June 24th, 2013
thesmithian
…there’s no plausible meaning of “democracy” in which democracy gave us Jim Crow. Even if you take democracy to relatively narrowly mean majoritarian voting procedures this doesn’t work. In the periods between the Civil War and World War II, African-Americans were a majority in quite a few southern states and would have been a large—and potentially decisive—voting bloc in the others. If, that is, they were allowed to vote. But instead of voting, African-Americans were disenfranchised via a systematic campaign of terrorist violence. The same campaign that gave us the Jim Crow social system. The point of the Civil Rights Act, including its provisions regulating private businesses, was to smash that social system. And it succeeded. It succeeded enormously. The amazing thing about retrospective opposition to the Civil Rights Act is that we know that it worked. It didn’t lead to social and economic cataclism. In fact, the American south has done quite a bit better since the smashing of white supremacy than it was doing previously.
Matthew Yglesias, at Slate
June 18th, 2013
thesmithian

Lionsgate has acquired screen rights to…Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, Devil In The Grove: Thurgood Marshall, The Groveland Boys, And The Dawn Of A New America, by Gilbert King…Set in 1949, with Florida’s…orange industry as a backdrop, as citrus barons got rich on the backs of…Jim Crow labor, the novel tells the all-too-familiar story of four young black men falsely accused of raping a 17-year-old white girl, and the NAACP’s legal team’s attempts to free them. It was a case that would bring an…attorney by the name of Thurgood Marshall into the…fray…

more.

June 9th, 2013
thesmithian

In the years immediately following the Civil War, America appeared to possess the will and the means to end racial segregation and give the same rights enjoyed by whites to its 4 million…freed black slaves. These…goals, of course, were not achieved for another century. During the intervening decades, the South saw the rise of Jim Crow and Judge Lynch…Goldstone convincingly lays the blame for this tragedy at the door of the institution that could have made the difference but did not: the United States Supreme Court.

more.

January 30th, 2013
thesmithian

First published in 1936, and revised and re-published for almost 30 years, it helped Black people travel across a hostile America.

more.

First published in 1936, and revised and re-published for almost 30 years, it helped Black people travel across a hostile America.

more.

December 3rd, 2012
thesmithian

…in the words of Dr. King…the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice. To occupy a space on that long arc…is monumentally important…To document this critical progression in the moral universe of the Texas prison system, as Berryhill skillfully does, is to play a part in the ongoing effort to bring down Jim Crow justice in Texas…

more.

…in the words of Dr. King…the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice. To occupy a space on that long arc…is monumentally important…To document this critical progression in the moral universe of the Texas prison system, as Berryhill skillfully does, is to play a part in the ongoing effort to bring down Jim Crow justice in Texas…

more.

November 13th, 2012
thesmithian

…the dramatic and deeply disturbing account of one of the least known, but most important, Jim Crow criminal cases of the 20th century.

more.

May 4th, 2012
thesmithian

The tragic image of the blues that originated in the Mississippi Delta ignores the competitive and entrepreneurial spirit of the bluesman himself. While it is certainly true that the music was forged…by the legacy of slavery and the insults of Jim Crow, the iconic image of the lone bluesman traveling the road with a guitar strapped to his back is also a story about innovators seizing on expanded opportunities brought about by the commercial and technological advances of the early 1900s. There was no Delta blues before there were cheap, readily available steel-string guitars. And those guitars, which transformed American culture, were brought to the boondocks by Sears, Roebuck & Co.

more.

April 15th, 2012
thesmithian

Tucked into the museum’s American Wing…is a hallway…displaying about 60 baseball cards of some of the first black players in the major leagues…they are poignant reminders of the hardships the players endured, from overt racism in cities with Jim Crow laws to more subtle digs from teammates, fans and owners.

more.

December 21st, 2010
thesmithian
From what we know about Barbour, he was a mere bystander. What’s appalling isn’t that he did not tear down the institution of Jim Crow with his bare hands, it’s that in order to defend being a bystander, he suggests that nothing was happening around him that was worth objecting to. That, like his odd indifference to a fellow student at Ole Miss who was living in a Hell Barbour recalls as a “a very pleasant experience,” does not vouch well for his character, but I’d argue that both tell us something about how differently race is lived in America.

Adam Serwer on Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour’s “rose-colored memories of Jim Crow.”

more, here.

November 29th, 2010
thesmithian
reading. period.

Anyone familiar with…baseball and its  history…knows by now of the great Negro Leagues…and then of Jackie  Robinson’s breaking of the color line with the Brooklyn Dodgers. But  relatively few know of an even longer and more unusual story, and one  that confounds many of our expectations about life in the Jim Crow  era. It is the story of interracial baseball, played before thousands of  avid fans of both races in virtually all corners of the United States  for decades before formal integration took place.

um, what? did not know … didn’t really think about …

Interracial games had been a part of baseball for almost as long as the  game has been played. Beginning as early as 1869 in Philadelphia, and  becoming a component of professionalized baseball culture by the 1880s,  teams of black players and teams of white players stepped out onto the  diamonds and went at it for nine innings. Remarkably enough, it was  possible for a team like the All Nations (with a roster of blacks,  Native Americans, Cubans, Polynesians, Asians, and Italians) to  “barnstorm” the country between 1912 and 1920, before they were  transformed into the legendary Kansas City Monarchs of the original  Negro National League.

getting. bold, mine. more, here.

reading. period.

Anyone familiar with…baseball and its history…knows by now of the great Negro Leagues…and then of Jackie Robinson’s breaking of the color line with the Brooklyn Dodgers. But relatively few know of an even longer and more unusual story, and one that confounds many of our expectations about life in the Jim Crow era. It is the story of interracial baseball, played before thousands of avid fans of both races in virtually all corners of the United States for decades before formal integration took place.

um, what? did not know … didn’t really think about …

Interracial games had been a part of baseball for almost as long as the game has been played. Beginning as early as 1869 in Philadelphia, and becoming a component of professionalized baseball culture by the 1880s, teams of black players and teams of white players stepped out onto the diamonds and went at it for nine innings. Remarkably enough, it was possible for a team like the All Nations (with a roster of blacks, Native Americans, Cubans, Polynesians, Asians, and Italians) to “barnstorm” the country between 1912 and 1920, before they were transformed into the legendary Kansas City Monarchs of the original Negro National League.

getting. bold, mine. more, here.

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