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March 22nd, 2014
thesmithian
Enough already about Michael Sam, Jason Collins, Richie Incognito, Jonathan Martin, concussions and the N-word. I turn on ESPN to get away from the stress of everyday life, to relax with my friends, to share some family time with the kids. Why do you keep shoving that stuff in my face?
February 1st, 2014
thesmithian

more than any position in sport, the…quarterback was…tied to the vilest presumptions of…racism. There are reasons why James Harris didn’t break pro football’s barrier until twenty-two years after Jackie Robinson broke pro baseball’s. There are reasons why the last four positions to be desegregated in pro football were the four with the most decision-making responsibility: free safety, middle linebacker, center, and quarterback.

more.

January 26th, 2014
thesmithian
Too many of us think that one ecstatic, triumphant black man showing honest, human emotion just seconds after making a play that very well could be written into the first appositive of his obituary, is not only offensive, but is also representative of the tens of millions of blacks in this country. And in two weeks time, in the year 2014, too many of us will be rooting for the Denver Broncos for no other reason than to knock Richard Sherman down a few notches, if only to put him back in his place.
January 25th, 2014
thesmithian

'Discussions about the ravages of [football] often come around to questions posed…to give fans some dispensation, such as: Given where these guys are from, how good were their other choices? What worth did their futures hold anyway? That sort of rationalizing serves only to make watching a beautiful but violent game less uncomfortable. And that’s the most thuggish thought of all.'

more.

January 24th, 2014
thesmithian

18-15n-77-30w:

becuzbacon:

fetchwillneverrhappen:

THIS!!! THIS RIGHT HERE!

But I’m sleeeeeeeep thoooooooo

Who’s more likely to get murdered/mutilated by cops?

[look of the hour]

(Source: michigansbestest)

Reblogged from 18° 15' N, 77° 30' W
January 23rd, 2014
thesmithian

'…what the silly controversy about an alpha male multimillionaire athlete…who completed a highlight reel reception during the Seahawks' victory over the San Francisco 49ers on Sunday…

reveals about the precarious nature of black masculinity and celebrity in the post civil rights era.

more.

January 20th, 2014
thesmithian
…to those who would call me a thug or worse because I show passion on a football field—don’t judge a person’s character by what they do between the lines. Judge a man by what he does off the field, what he does for his community, what he does for his family. But people find it easy to take shots on Twitter, and to use racial slurs and bullying language far worse than what you’ll see from me. It’s sad and somewhat unbelievable to me that the world is still this way, but it is. I can handle it.
Richard Sherman, Seattle Seahawks
November 21st, 2013
thesmithian

…it’s more challenging for Americans to take uncomplicated pleasure in watching young men, many of whom grew up in poverty, play a sport they‘re not sure they want their own sons to pursue. It has been the American way to tolerate our moral misgivings about the public institutions that define us, from Southern segregation to drunk driving. Then, sometimes abruptly, the queasy reservations veer into disgust and rejection.

more.

November 19th, 2013
thesmithian

In saying “yes” to the life he’s lived, Tony Dorsett is saying “yes”…to being a star with the Cowboys, winning the Super Bowl, and having years of feeling a deep, close bond with teammates. He is saying “yes” to…people who believed that what he was doing mattered, that he was special. He is saying “yes” to earning many millions of dollars in salary, endorsements, and appearances. “Yes” to a post-football life in which he is still Tony Dorsett.

yet

He is also saying “yes” to memories that now recede from him, and to moods that scare him…He is saying “yes” to having lots of money, with no way to enjoy it. “Yes” to a fear of what comes next. “Yes” until he is no longer able to distinguish “yes” from “no.” And he is saying “yes” to family and friends who must watch. “Yes” to what it does to them. “Would I do it all over again?” It is a cruel question for anyone.

more.

September 30th, 2013
thesmithian

Baseball’s Atlanta Braves and Cleveland Indians, football’s Kansas City Chiefs and hockey franchises like the Chicago Blackhawks have likewise come in for criticism. But the Redskins have far and away drawn the most ire, and some question whether clinging to the name, rather than engaging the opposition in meaningful dialogue, will be possible much longer.

more.

August 28th, 2013
thesmithian

It’s this bio—a military brat with a white wife…an…ambitious 23-year-old black man who frequently mentions law school and post-football political aspirations but refuses to name his political orientation—that has fascinated so many people and confused not a few others. None more so, perhaps, than Rob Parker, a former commentator on ESPN’s First Take. One day last December, after RG3 had given an interview in which he said, for about the millionth time, that he didn’t want to be “defined” by his race, Parker shocked…when he said, “My question, which is just a straight honest question: Is he a brother, or is he a cornball brother?… He’s black, he kind of does his thing, but he’s not really down with the cause. He’s not one of us.” The comments leaped off the show and into the national conversation, sparking an ugly debate about RG3’s “blackness.” Parker was suspended and eventually let go.

more of a long read, here.

It’s this bio—a military brat with a white wife…an…ambitious 23-year-old black man who frequently mentions law school and post-football political aspirations but refuses to name his political orientation—that has fascinated so many people and confused not a few others. None more so, perhaps, than Rob Parker, a former commentator on ESPN’s First Take. One day last December, after RG3 had given an interview in which he said, for about the millionth time, that he didn’t want to be “defined” by his race, Parker shocked…when he said, “My question, which is just a straight honest question: Is he a brother, or is he a cornball brother?… He’s black, he kind of does his thing, but he’s not really down with the cause. He’s not one of us.” The comments leaped off the show and into the national conversation, sparking an ugly debate about RG3’s “blackness.” Parker was suspended and eventually let go.

more of a long read, here.



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