>

March 21st, 2014
thesmithian

'What this has meant in the U.S. and elsewhere…is that the “good guys” who want to implement policies to get the unemployed back to work are too often caving to the pressure of the “pain caucuses” pushing sky-is-falling predictions about “runaway inflation and soaring interest rates” as a justification to do nothing. It’s a battle of good versus evil…and the bad guys seem to be winning…'

more.

March 18th, 2014
thesmithian
…race is the Rosetta Stone that makes sense of many otherwise incomprehensible aspects of US politics.
February 9th, 2014
thesmithian
Maybe the truly savvy thing is to take policy seriously, not to pretend that it’s all a game, and that only you understand the rules?
December 10th, 2013
thesmithian
…the odds…are that the long-term unemployed will be cut off, thanks to a perfect marriage of callousness—a complete lack of empathy for the unfortunate—with bad economics. But then, hasn’t that been the story of just about everything lately?
Paul Krugman, at the New York Times
July 15th, 2013
thesmithian

'Would a third successive defeat bring the G.O.P. to its senses? Perhaps not…'

As the big money that traditionally financed the party continues to migrate towards the Democrats, a process that the rise of Silicon Valley has accentuated, it’s at least conceivable that the Republicans could become a rump party—a determined but diminishing redoubt of white reaction. If that were to happen, the big political battles of the future would take place within the Democratic Party, between the pro-business Rubin-Clinton-Obama wing and the more populist Krugman-Warren-Spitzer wing. It’s a possibility, but I can’t see it happening. The two-party system is too well established, the G.O.P. is too entrenched at the local level, and history demonstrates that a third successive defeat, unlike a second one, can have a cathartic effect.

more.

July 12th, 2013
thesmithian
…when Republicans engineer sharp cuts in unemployment benefits, block the expansion of Medicaid and seek deep cuts in food stamp funding—all of which they have, in fact, done—they may be disproportionately hurting Those People; but they are also inflicting a lot of harm on the struggling Northern white families they are supposedly going to mobilize. Which brings us back to why libertarian populism is…bunk. You could…argue that destroying the safety net is a libertarian act—maybe freedom’s just another word for nothing left to lose. But populist it isn’t.
Paul Krugman, at the New York Times
February 18th, 2013
thesmithian
…just about everyone except Republican men believes that the lowest-paid workers deserve a raise. And they’re right. We should raise the minimum wage, now.
Paul Krugman, at the New York Times
January 27th, 2013
thesmithian
…in deep red states like Louisiana or Kansas, Republicans are much freer to act on their beliefs—which means moving strongly to comfort the comfortable while afflicting the afflicted. Which brings me back to Mr. Jindal, who declared in his speech that “we are a populist party.” No, you aren’t. You’re a party that holds a large proportion of Americans in contempt. And the public may have figured that out.
Paul Krugman, at the New York Times
November 25th, 2012
thesmithian
Whenever you see some business person…complaining about how he or she can’t find workers with the necessary skills, ask what wage they’re offering. Almost always, it turns out that what said business person really wants is highly (and expensively) educated workers at a manual-labor wage. No wonder they come up short.
Paul Krugman, at the New York Times.
August 3rd, 2012
thesmithian
…the overriding story of the past few years is not Mr. Obama’s mistakes but the scorched-earth opposition of Republicans, who have done everything they can to get in his way—and who now, having blocked the president’s policies, hope to win the White House by claiming that his policies have failed.
Paul Krugman, at the NYT.
Loading tweets...

@danamo

Likes

culture is politics. politics is culture.
[beta]

Networks

Following